Tag Archives: Veronika_Khariv

Neuroprotection in spinal cord injury and disease

Published / by spinecenter

Status: Ongoing


Description:

This project focuses on the mechanisms underlying plasma membrane calcium ATPase and collapsing response mediator protein-mediated neuronal degeneration and neuroprotection in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and spinal cord injury.  A combination of in vivo models, spinal cord neuronal cultures and genetically modified mice are used.

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The role of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 (PMCA2) in the processing of nociceptive and neuropathic pain signals in the spinal cord

Published / by spinecenter

Status: Ongoing


Description:

This project investigates the contribution of PMCA2 to mechanisms underlying the processing of nociceptive and pain signals in the spinal cord dorsal horn by use of genetically modified mice, tissue culture and animal models of injury and disease.

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Fifth Annual ‘Current Advances in Spinal Cord Injury Research’ Symposium, May 13th, 2015

Published / by spinecenter

The Reynolds Family Spine Laboratory at the Spine Center of New Jersey invites you to the fifth annual Current Advances in Spinal Cord Injury Research Symposium.

On Wednesday, May 13th, 2015 you are invited to attend the Fifth Annual Current Advances in Spinal Cord Injury Research Symposium, hosted by the Reynolds Family Spine Laboratory at Rutgers in Newark, NJ, where distinguished faculty from North America will present and discuss the current advances in basic science and clinical research on spinal cord injury.

The Symposium’s scientific faculty includes:

Guest
Speaker
Title of Presentation
Allan D. Levi, M.D., Ph.D., FACS

University of Miami

“Clinical Translational Studies in Spinal Cord Injury”
Jacqueline C. Bresnahan, Ph.D.

University of California

“Experimental Modeling of Cervical Spinal Cord Injury”
Scott R. Whittemore, Ph.D.

University of Louisville

“The Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in Spinal Cord Injury:  A New Therapeutic Target?”
Naren L. Banik, Ph.D.

Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston

“Estrogen Efficacy in Spinal Cord Injury”
Steve Lacroix, Ph.D.

Laval University

“Endogenous Danger Signals Initiating Neuroinflammation and Tissue Damage After Spinal Cord Injury”
John Houle, Ph.D.

Drexel University College of Medicine

“Exercise after Spinal Cord Injury as an Agent for Neuroprotection, Regeneration, and Rehabilitation”

The Symposium will be held in the comfortable and spacious 12th Avenue Pavilion, at the Delta Dental Educational Conference Center at the New Jersey Medical School of Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 50 12th Avenue, Newark, NJ. Convenient and secure parking is available.

If you wish to register for this event or have any questions, please contact Lori Pratt, NJMS, Program Coordinator 973-972-4702 or lpratt@njms.rutgers.edu


 

SCNJ_Symposium_2015_0.pdf

Related Faculty & Staff

  • Robert F. Heary, M.D.
  • Stella Elkabes, Ph.D.
  • Ira M. Goldstein, M.D.
  • Lorelei Pratt, Ph.D.
  • Ayomi Ratnayake, M.S.
  • Li Ni, M.D.
  • Cigdem Acioglu, M.S.
  • Veronika Khariv, M.S.
  • Alexandra Pallottie, B.S.
  • Lun Li, M.S.
  • Devesh Jalan, M.D.
  • Neginder Saini, B.S.

Veronika Khariv Awarded the Dean Morris Schaffer Endowed Scholarship

Published / by spinecenter

Veronika Khariv, M.S., a third-year pre-doctoral student in the Cell Biology, Neuroscience and Physiology Track in the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences and a member of The Reynolds Family Spine Laboratory, Department of Neurological Surgery, NJMS, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Newark, NJ received the Dean Morris Schaffer Endowed Scholarship Award.   The award acknowledges an outstanding doctoral student at the early stages of their thesis research.  Veronika Khariv is performing her investigations towards the Ph.D. degree under the mentorship of Stella Elkabes, Ph.D. and Robert F. Heary, M.D.  Her thesis research studies the role of plasma membrane calcium ATPase 2 in central pain mechanisms and in neuronal repair in animal models of spinal cord injury and multiple sclerosis.